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Job Trends 2010: The New Workplace Will Be Different

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CRYSTAL BALL 2010:

JOB CREATION WILL BE DIFFERENT THIS TIME;

PART-TIME AND CONTRACTORS

WILL BE BIGGER FACTOR IN WHITE-COLLAR WORKFORCE

 STAMFORD, CT December 7, 2009 -- Any hope of a rapid return to ‘full employment’ is wishful thinking, according to Flexible Resources, Inc., a staffing and consulting firm that has been working with small and large companies to provide interim professionals while companies have been dealing with layoffs and hiring freezes over the past 18 months.

             “Companies have been operating for more than a year now with dramatically pared down workforces and the payrolls to go along with them. We don’t anticipate a dramatic V-shaped upswing in employment,” according to Nadine Mockler, president of Flexible Resources, Inc.

             “I think we are seeing a major change from what we have come to recognize as ‘full employment’ – that is very low unemployment numbers, with the vast majority of white collar workers employed in full-time permanent positions with a full package of benefits.

             Instead, Flexible Resources sees the continuing growth of full- and part-time contract assignments, in part because companies have grown accustomed to a high level of productivity and talent available to them without committing to permanent positions.

             “We are seeing most of our contract employees’ relationships with their employers extended again and again throughout the downturn, well beyond the initial term of their employment,” says Mockler. “That says to us that companies are enjoying the benefits of top-quality professionals in the most cost-effective way.

             It’s a good news/bad news scenario, according to Flexible Resources, which has for more than 20 years created a wide array of flexile work arrangements at the professional level.

             “We think fewer professionals will be engaged in permanent positions with full benefits, but on the other hand, there will be more flexibility, with less-than-fulltime arrangements, and companies will embrace employees who will telecommute, thus keeping overhead costs low,” says Ms. Mockler’s partner Laurie Young.

             “We have always promoted flexible work arrangements at the most cost-effective way to attract and retain talent, improve morale and focus, and increase productivity. And the economic crisis has forced companies to consider new ways to work.”

 Visit www.flexibleresources.com and read our Flexnotes blog, and follow us at www.twitter.com/flexresources.  MEDIA CONTACT: Redbird Communications 203-968-0786; jgfredo@optonline.net